McCOOK REPUBLICAN NEWS 1918

ANNIVERSARIES:

About fifty friends and neighbors of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Meyers gathered together with well filled baskets and most agreeably surprised them on Tuesday evening, January 22, it being their 30th wedding anniversary. They were presented with a beautiful rocking chair as a remembrance of the occasion. Friday 8 Feb 1918

WEDDINGS:

Brother and Sister Marries - A double wedding took place Saturday, December 29, 1917, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. Atherton, 202 East Second Street, when their daughter, Miss May, was married to Mr. Clyde Shaw, and Miss Nellie Shaw, sister of Mr. Shaw, was united to Mr. Archie Mock at the same time, Rev. A.L. Zink, of the Christian church officiating. Mr. and Mrs. Shaw will reside in Bethany, and the other couple in Stockville. Friday 4 Jan 1918

Randal-Austin - Wednesday morning, January 16, 1918, Miss Susan Helen Randal and Mr. Baxter Blaine Austin were united in marriage at St. Patrick's church Rev. Father A.H. Kunz, O.M.I. officiating. The bride is the second daughter of Mr. John Randal, ex-county commissioner. She was born and has always lived near this city. She is a splendid type of the young American women and a general favorite in a large circle of acquaintances. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. F.M. Austin, south of town. He is a progressive young farmer and stock raiser who has been quite successful and quite prominent among the younger set. Miss Kathryne Randal and Mr. John Randal, Jr., sister and brother of the bride, were bridesmaid and groomsman. The bride was attired in a very becoming suit of burgundy. After the ceremony a wedding breakfast was served to the families of the contracting parties at the home of the bride's sister, Mrs. Dexter T. Spencer on Fifth street East. The bride and groom received many useful and pretty gifts to assist them in starting out in their new life. The happy couple left at eleven o'clock in the groom's auto for Dresden, Kansas, where they took the train for Camp Funston, to visit his brother, Charles. After a short visit there they go to Kansas City and will return next week. They will be"At Home" to their many friends in a pretty, new, modern bungalow which the groom has just completed on his farm in Gerver precinct, after February 20. The best wishes of The Republican are extended to the happy young couple. Friday 18 Jan 1918

Indianola - From The Reporter - When H.F. Bower, the city's light commissioner, dropped his tools on Saturday, January 12th, and hurried off to Kansas few of our people were aware of the reason of his sudden disappearance or the purpose of his mission until Thursday, of last week, when he returned home with his bride. Mrs. Bower is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Lamb, of Stafford, Kans and an accomplished young lady, and a favorite with her young friends in her former home. The wedding took place on Wednesday, January 16th at the home of the bride's sister, Mrs. C.F. Downey, at St. John's Kansas, in the presence of a few of the close friends of the contracting parties. Friday 22 Feb 1918

Mr. Reed Henton and Miss Sadie Graham, were married at McCook, Nebraska, Saturday, February 9th, 1918. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Neut Graham. She is one of Danbury's most beautiful, as well as most popular young ladies, being a great favorite with the younger social set. The groom who is a son of Mr. and Mrs. W.T. Henton, is a prosperous young farmer of this vicinity. He has grown to manhood here, and is well and favorable known to all. Friday 22 Feb 1918

She Got Fitz - Saturday morning, March 2, 1918, Miss Sadie Carver and Mr. E.J. Fitzgerald, of Benkelman, were married in this city, Judge F.M. Colfer officiating. The groom is the editor and proprietor of the Benkelman News-Chronicle, and previous to purchasing the plant had been employed by the former owner, W.C. Israel, for a number of years. Nearly every printer in this part of the state knows"Fitz" personally and all join in hearty congratulations. The bride has been employed in the News-Chronicle for a time as local editor and made such a hit with Fitz he did not want to run any risk of her leaving Benkelman. The feeling seems to have been mutual and they became man and wife, Miss Carver came to Benkelman from Chicago, and returned there a week ago packed and shipped her personal effects to Benkelman, was met in this city, Saturday by her finance and married. They left that morning for their home. May their future be a happy and prosperous one. Friday 8 Mar 1918

Marian Norris to Marry - A dispatch to the Omaha Bee from Washington states that Senator and Mrs. G.W. Norris announce the marriage of their daughter, Marian to Lieutenant Harvey A. Nelson, of Omaha, now stationed at Camp Dodge, Iowa, tomorrow, Saturday, at their home in Washington at 4 o'clock. Miss Norris has been attending the University of Nebraska, and joined her parents in Washington last Friday. Friday 15 Mar 1918

Walroth-Phillippi - Wednesday, March 27, 1918, at the Methodist parsonage, Miss Jennie Walroth and Mr. Albert H. Phillippi were united in marriage. Mr. and Mrs. F.C. Ruegnitz, cousins of the groom acting as bridesmaid and groomsman, Rev. H.C. Seidel, officiating. The bride has been following the occupation of nurse and has made her home with Mrs. W.D. Burnett. The groom was born and grew to manhood in this county and is in present employed by the McCook Hardware Co. The hearty congratulations of their many friends are extended to the happy couple. They will make their home here. Friday 29 Mar 1918

Galusha - Henderson - Miss Pattie M. Galusha, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Galusha, was united in marriage to James Y. Henderson at the home of her parents, 511 First Street East, Thursday morning, May 16, 1918 at 9:30 o'clock, Rev. Louis Hieb, officiating. Both young people are widely known here. The bride graduated from the high school in the Class of 1913. The groom being until lately the local representative of the Great Western Sugar Co., but was transferred a few weeks ago to Ft. Morgan, Colorado. The congratulations and best wishes of a host of friends go with the young couple for a long and happy life. They left that morning for Ft. Morgan where they will make their home. Friday 17 May 1918

Gatewood-Dorwart - Thursday, May 16, at 8:30 a.m. Miss Theresa F. Gatewood and Dr. Yule W. Dorwart were married at the home of the bride's parents, Dr. and Mrs. A.T. Gatewood, Rev. Louis Hieb, pastor of the Congregational church officiating. The bride is a graduate of the McCook high school with the class of 1912 and has been a successful teacher in the city schools for the past four years. The groom is also a graduate of the McCook high school in the same class as his bride, and from the Lincoln Dental college in 1916, since then he has been practicing his profession in this city, and is fast building up a good business. He enlisted in the Reserve Dental Corps and has been notified he will be called into service about the first of June. Both young people are deservedly popular in their circles and the best wishes for their future is extended to them by everyone. They left a couple of hours after the ceremony for Denver, for a wedding trip. Friday 17 May 1918

Indianola Banker Marries - Wednesday, June 12, 1918, William A. Reynolds, cashier of the Farmers and Merchants State Bank of Indianola, and Miss Mary Foley, of Indianola, were joined in marriage at 7:30 a.m. in the Catholic parsonage and came up to McCook to go west on train No. 9, for their wedding trip. The groom is well known all over the county, having served two terms in the state legislature, as the representative from this county, and by his genial manner has made many friends among those with whom he came in contact. The bride is the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Foley, who live north of Indianola. She has been bookkeeper in the State Bank at Indianola for the past three years, and is a very estimable young lady. The best wishes of a host of friends is extended, to the happy couple for a bright and prosperous future. Friday 4 Jun 1918

Married in Denver - Yesterday's Denver News stated a marriage license had been issued in that city to Thomas Johnston, of Denver, and Martha L. Wenger, of McCook. Friday 14 Jun 1918

Wockenfuss-Hahn - Tuesday evening, June 11, 1918, a very pretty home wedding occurred at the residence of Rev. and Mrs. G.E. Wockenfuss, in this city, when their daughter, Miss Martha, was married to Mr. G. Earl Hahn, of Aurora, Illinois, the bride's father officiating, in the presence of the families of the contracting couple and a few intimate friends. The bride has lived in this city with her parents for some time and for several years past has been clerking in DeGroff & Co.'s store. She has a wide acquaintance, and is popular with those who know her. The groom was formerly employed by the Burlington in the store keeper's office here, going from here to St. Joe with Mr. Britt in the same capacity and later transferred to Aurora, Illinois. The best wishes of a host of friends among them The Republican, is extended to the happy pair for a long and happy life. Friday 14 Jun 1918

Knowles-Jones - Miss Jane Knowles, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Knowles, of this city, and Mr. A. Corbin Jones, were quietly married Wednesday July 3, 1918, at the Methodist parsonage in Omaha, Rev. Titus Lowe, officiating. They spent a few days visiting the groom's mother, Mrs. J.A. Jones, and his sister in Lincoln, before returning here. The bride has lived here practically all her life and graduated from the McCook high school with the Class of 1915. For the past three years she has been working in the office of the superintendent of the city schools as stenographer and keeping the records of the schools, which position she has filled very satisfactorily and expects to continue in that capacity until her husband returns from the war. The groom came here about a year ago to take the place of Donald Jeffries, who resigned to go into business for himself, as traveling sales for M.E. Smith & Co., a wholesale dry goods firm, and has made many friends here since then. He was born in"old Virginia" and is proud of it. He enlisted about two weeks ago in Chicago and was assigned to the navy medical corps, and has just been ordered to report for duty at the Great Lakes training station, for which place he will leave Monday. The best wishes and congratulations of a host of friends are extended to the happy young couple for a long and happy life. Friday 12 Jul 1918

Neilson-Elliott - Sunday evening, July 14, 1918, at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. L.P. Neilson, in this city, Miss Myrtle M. Neilson and Mr. William C. Elliott, of Grand Island, were united in marriage, Rev. A.L. Zink, pastor of the Christian church officiated. The bride has lived here practically all her life, and is a fine young lady. For some time past she has been employed in the Nebraska Telephone Co.'s office here. The groom is employed by the same company at Grand Island. The best wishes of a host of friends with whom The Republican joins, are extended to the happy young couple. Friday 19 Jul 1918

The wedding of Alvin Ratner and Ethel Lingo took place Tuesday morning at 7:30 in St. Patrick's church Father McCullough, O.M.I., performing the ceremony. The young couple are both from Benkelman and were attended by Ida Lingo, sister of the bride, and Charles Laumann. Friday 23 Aug 1918

Brown-Diehl - Announcement was received here last week of the marriage of Miss Myrtle, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Brown, to Herbert Diehl on Saturday, September 7, 1918, at Cheyenne, Wyoming. They will be at home after October 1, 1918, Hudson, Wyoming. The bride will be remembered by many young people of this city, she having lived here with her parents they moving to Lincoln about a year ago, and then to Holdrege this summer. The happy young couple have the best wishes of the bride's many friends here. Friday 29 Sep 1918

Traut - Schmere - Wednesday evening a quiet home wedding was solemnized at the residence of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Traut, Rev. F. Sattler officiating uniting Miss Mable G. Traut and Mr. John Schmere, both well known and highly respected young people. Following the ceremony supper was served to the wedding party and guests. The best wishes of many friends for a long and happy life follow the happy young couple to their new home in Albia, Iowa, for which place they left that evening. Friday 23 Oct 1918

Moore-Schmitz - Miss Alice Moore and Mr. Claud W. Schmitz both well known young people of this vicinity, were united in marriage, Wednesday morning, November 13, 1918 at St. Patrick's rectory, Rev. A.H. Kunz O.M.I. officiating. Miss Genevieve McAdams and Mike Moore, brother of the bride acting as bridesmaid and groomsman. The wedding party went to the home of the brides sister, Mrs. Frank Hassler, and a three course breakfast was served them. The happy young couple then left in their auto for a honeymoon tour in the west. The best wishes of a host of friends are extended to the happy young couple. Friday 15 Nov 1918

Sloey-Stone - Monday evening, November 11, 1918, at 6 o'clock, Mrs. Anna E. Sloey of Woodstock, Illinois, who has been manager of the Rose Hat store since it opened, and Mr. John C. Stone, proprietor of the Monte Cristo hotel were united in marriage at St. Patrick's R.C. Rectory, Rev. A.H. Kunz, O.M.I. officiating. After the ceremony Mr. and Mrs. H.C. Clapp gave a dinner at their home on first street east to the wedding party. The bride has made many friends during her residence here. The groom has been a resident of this city for a number of years and has many friends here and all over the state. All, and with whom The Republican joins extends their best wishes to the newly married couple. Friday 15 Nov 1918

Kautz-Wagner - Sunday morning, December 8, 1918 Miss Anna C. Kautz, of Hitchcock county, and Mr. John G. Wagner, of this city were united in marriage at the Congregational church in west McCook, Rev. Ferdinand Sattler, the pastor, officiating. The couple were attended by the Misses Elizabeth Kautz and Mollie Propp. Messrs. Jacob Fahrenbruck and Daniel Wagner. The wedding party went to the home of the brides parents, south of Culbertson in an auto and a bounteous wedding dinner was served. The best wishes of their many friends are extended to the happy couple. They will begin housekeeping at once and make their home in this city. Friday 13 Dec 1918

McIntosh-Goddard - Friends in this city have just received the announcement of the marriage of Miss Grace McIntosh, formerly principal of the McCook High School, to Lt. Clinton F. Goddard, on Wednesday evening, December 25, 1918, at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. H.H. McIntosh in Lincoln, Nebraska. Friday 27 Dec 1918

DEATHS:

Little Daughter Dies - The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jabez Barraclough, Ruby Marcella, died Sunday afternoon, January 6, 1918, after an illness of ten days, aged 8 weeks. The funeral services were held at the home Monday afternoon, Rev. H.C. Sidel, of the Methodist church, officiating. The sorrowing parents have the sympathy of their many friends in their affliction. Friday 11 Jan 1918

William A. Premer was born near Portland, Indiana, August 14, 1885. He moved to Bartley, Nebr., with his parents in November of the same year where he continued to reside until his death, excepting three years which he spent in Haigler, Nebr. Death came suddenly on January 5, 1918, causing a great shock to the entire community. On the day of his death he spent the forenoon at his usual work about home. In the afternoon he went to Bartley, with a load of wheat, feeling apparently, as well as ever. After unloading his wheat he went to the lumber yard for some lumber. While near his wagon he was seen to reel and fall to the ground. Men ran to his aid and medical assistance was immediately summoned but death had claimed him almost instantly. He was married to Miss Agnes Sullivan on November 29, 1910. To this union was born one child, but God saw fit to call the mother and infant to himself on October 31, 1912. He was married to Miss Ethel Teters on September 30, 1915. To them was born one child, little Helen, who is less than one and a half years old. Friday 18 Jan 1918

Mrs. A.C. Hill Dies - Mrs. A.C. Hill, mother of Mrs. Fred C. Fuller, died Tuesday night at the home of her daughter, with whom she has lived for some time, after an illness that gradually brought her life to an end. The deceased was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, August 26, 1840, and died in McCook, Nebraska, Tuesday night, January 29, 1918. She was married September 4, 1858, to Jesse A. Hill in Knoxville, Illinois. She is survived by four children: two daughters, Mrs. F.C. Fuller, of this city, Miss Jessie Hill, of Keokuk, Iowa, two sons, A.S. and A.H. Hill, both of Galesburg, Illinois. The funeral services were held this afternoon at 2 o'clock in St. Alban's Episcopal church, Rev. J.H. Johnson the rector, officiating. Miss Hill arrived Wednesday night and the two sons this afternoon on No. 9, which was quite late, and interment made in Longview cemetery after their arrival. The family have the sympathy of the community in the hour of sorrow. Friday 1 Feb 1918

Infant Child Dies - The six-week-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Clark, who live on the Morlan ranch, south of this city, died Monday. Funeral services were held Tuesday, Rev. H.C. Sidel, officiating and the little body buried in Longview cemetery. The sympathy of the community is extended to the sorrowing family. Friday 8 Feb 1918

Mrs. Dryden Dies - Mrs. R.F. Dryden, wife of R.F. Dryden, conductor on the Burlington, died at her home in Hastings Monday, February 4, 1918. She and her family lived in this city before moving to Hastings. A baby girl accompanied the mother from this world into the next. Mrs. Dryden's remains were taken to Avon, Illinois, where her parents live, for burial. The deceased is survived by her husband and a son, eight years old. Friday 8 Feb 1918

Died at Age of 91 Year - Jack Hardy, for many years an engineer on the McCook division of the Burlington, and for some years running out of this city, received word Tuesday night that his mother, who had been failing in strength for some time, died at her home in Ottumwa, Iowa, at the age of 91 years. Friday 8 Feb 1918

Baby Monks Dies - Blanchard Reid, the infant son of Mrs. Fred Monks, died at the McCook General Hospital Friday, February 1, 1918, aged one week. Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at the hospital, Rev. H.J. Johnson, rector of St. Alban's Episcopal church officiating. The members of St. Alban's guild and many friends of Mrs. Monks attending the services. The little body was buried in Longview cemetery. The sympathy of the community is extended to the sorrowing mother. Friday 8 Feb 1918

Passing Away - Frances G. Runnels - The death early Wednesday morning January 30, 1918, of the daughter of Mr. F.C. and Mrs. Eva Griswold Runnels, brought sadness to many hearts in this city, and closed the life on this earth of a beautiful young lady. Frances G. Runnels was born in Boston, Massachusetts, October 11, 1900, and died in this city on the morning of Wednesday, January 30, 1918, at 7:15 o'clock. She came with her parents to live in McCook, March 1, 1908, attended the public schools here until about four years ago when she went to Denver and entered a private school for girls. During the summer vacation last year she accompanied her mother on a visit to friends in Massachusetts and other places in the east. While bathing one day at one of the beaches, she had a hemorrhage, which was the first intimation of the fond parents had that their daughter's health was in any danger. The mother at once ended her visit and came home, since then the most noted specialists in the medical profession could do to help her regain her health was done, but to no avail. Frances was an unusually bright, beautiful girl, with a most engaging and likable disposition, who made friends with everyone whom she met. Burial service was held in St. Alban's Episcopal church, in which she had been baptized, and confirmed several years ago. The service was very impressive and the address of the Rector H.J. Johnson, was a most comforting one to the bereaved parents and to all who had friends gone before. The floral offerings were unusually beautiful and numerous, coming from almost every division of the Burlington railroad in the west, Mr. Runnels being the chief dispatcher of this division, as well as from their many friends here and elsewhere. The pallbearers were: Edward Browne, Cato Wray, Clyde Whitney, James Longhagen, Ted Barnes, and Cloyd Clark. Interment was made in Longview cemetery. The heartfelt sympathy of everyone is extended to the sorrowing parents. Friday 22 Feb 1918

Joseph Allen Called - After a long, useful and honorable life, of which almost half of it was spent in this part of the state, Joseph Allen has finished his work in this life and gone to the next to join his many friends who have gone before and wait to welcome those who still remain. Mr. Allen was one of those rare gentlemen, who having accumulated much in this world leaves it most highly respected by all who have ever had dealings with him and in all walks of life, and leaves a name, that will always be cherished by his widow, sons, and many friends. He was a vigorous, active man and continued to work long after those of his age retire. His integrity was never questioned and his word always accepted. Joseph Allen was born in Venango county, Pennsylvania and when five years old his parents moved to Ohio, and nine years afterward to Iowa, where he lived and became quite prosperous. In 1884 he came to Nebraska and purchased a large ranch on the Willow and later a large tract of land in the sand hills. He was married to Miss Effie Ickes, in Iowa, in 1884. Three sons were born of this union, Raymond and Robert, of this county, and George, of Stromsburg, who with his wife survive him. He traded his ranch a few years ago on the Willow for one in Box Elder precinct. He purchased property in McCook several years ago and divided his residence during the year between the ranch and the city, but for the past couple of years has lived in the city most of the time. For several months he has been failing in health but was able to walk about town until a few weeks ago, since when he has been confined to his home. His death occurred early Saturday morning, March 9, 1918, at the age of 89 years. Funeral services were held in the Methodist church Sunday afternoon, Rev. H.C. Seidel, officiating and were largely attended by citizens and neighbors and friends from the country, where he lived so many years, notwithstanding bad roads and weather. The pallbearers were his neighbors and friends who were: I.W. Spaulding, Benjamin Doyle, George Brown, T.F. West, W.B. Whitaker and C.W. Barnes. His body was laid to rest in Riverview cemetery. The sympathy of everyone is extended to the widow and sons in their sorrow for their great loss. Friday Mar 1918

Bertha Shepherd Dies - Bertha Shepherd, the twelve year old daughter and only child of Mr. and Mrs. Perry Shepherd, who live north of this city, died Sunday evening at 9 o'clock, following an operation. The young lady had been suffering for some time and was taken to Lincoln for examination and it was found there was some obstruction in her bowels, which could only be relieved by an operation. She was brought back and taken to the General hospital where Dr. Everett, of Lincoln, performed the operation Sunday afternoon, but in her weakened condition the young patient was unable to recover. Funeral services were held in the Methodist church in this city Tuesday afternoon, Rev. H.C. Seidel, officiating and were largely attended by friends and neighbors of the bereaved parents. Six young girl friends of the deceased, dressed in white, acted as pall bearers. The heartfelt sympathy of the community go out to the sorrowing family in their great bereavement. Friday 1 Mar 1918

Mrs. Francis Swartz - Amy Alice Holtzman was born in Frederick county, Maryland on July 29, 1848. In 1870 she moved to the west, and after spending a year in Illinois came to Nebraska. Here she lived most of the time and was her home at the time of her death. She was married to Francis Swartz, on March 24, 1867, and she was the mother of seventeen children of whom four died. In early life Mrs. Swartz was converted and united herself with the United Brethern church, but on moving to the west she united with the Methodist church of which she was a member when she died. She was a devoted wife and mother, was faithful to the trust God left her, and lived an earnest Christian life. Her death was beautiful and the testimony she gave just before she waved her final farewell to her loved ones, floods the gloom of her departure with the brightest sunlight. She left a hope that no power on earth can destroy. Mrs. Swartz had been more or less indisposed for several years past, but about two weeks ago she was stricken with the illness that terminated in her decease on Tuesday morning March 12, 1918, survived by her husband, seven sons, six daughters, thirty-nine grandchildren, one great-grandchild, one brother and one sister. Funeral services were conducted by the Rev. H.C. Seidel, and several members of the Methodist choir at the farm home near McCook where she had lived for some years past, on Wednesday afternoon, March 13, 1918. Interment was made at Riverview cemetery. Friday 15 Mar 1918

Baby Walters Died - The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A.P. Walters aged six months died Saturday. The heartfelt sympathy goes out to the bereaved parents. Funeral services were held Monday at the home. Rev. A.L. Zink, officiating, and the little body interred in Longview cemetery. Friday 29 Mar 1918

A. Martin Anderson - The other pioneer who passed away this week, died at Hastings, Wednesday, April 10, 1918, after a long illness and his remains brought to his late home for burial yesterday. Martin had been a resident of Indianola for forty-three years. Coming to that town when it was still in its infancy, the same year the town site was platted. Here he married, raised his family and lived the balance of his days respected by everyone. He was a blacksmith by trade, and a genius at the business, and followed it to the last. He was widely known in the early days and is still pleasantly remembered by the older residents of this part of the state. Funeral services will be held in Indianola this afternoon. The Republican is sorry it has no more data of these two interesting men to give its readers, as they had much to do in the building up of this part of the state, each in his way. Friday 12 Apr 1918

Bradley B. Duckworth - He was born near Newark, Ohio, in 1834, died at Indianola, Nebraska Monday, April 8, 1918, aged 84 years. In 1870 he came with his wife and family to Omaha where he worked at his trade. He came to this county in 1873 and homesteaded on the Beaver and acquired soon several adjoining quarters on which tract is now located the town of Marion. He traded this land to Powell Bros. for the mill property in Indianola about 1888 which he ran for some time. He was elected county treasurer and afterwards served several terms as county commissioner. He was of a jovial mature, strong character and a generous disposition. The funeral services were held Wednesday at the home by Rev. Mr. Parker of the Methodist church preaching the sermon, under the auspices of the Masonic order, and was attended by an unusually large number. Friday 12 Apr 1918

Obituary - George Cappel was born December 19, 1861, at Patersbach, Germany and died, April 21, 1918 at the age of 57 years, 4 months and 2 days. In 1884, he was married to Caroline Kreutz, his surviving wife. The marriage was blessed with six children, four boys and two daughters all of whom are living except one daughter, who passed to the Other Shore seven years ago. After coming to this country in 1884 departed first resided five years in Ohio. In 1889, he took up a homestead in Frontier county, near St. Ann. Since 1907, he lived on his farm near Perry. Failing health caused him to cease active farm work for the last two years. Last winter he sought relief at the hospital in Omaha. After returning to McCook, he complicated illness and heart trouble became more serious and caused his death last Sunday night. Departed was a true Christian and a kind father to his children. Several days before his death, he gave orders to buy each of his eleven grandchildren a War Savings Stamp and to contribute $5.00 to the Red Cross fund. At his funeral were present his four boys, August, Fred, Carl and George, and their wives and children; his daughter, Mrs. Therese Raaft, of Illinois could not be present as she had visited her Father here lately and had left only a few days before his death. The funeral services were conducted from the Methodist church last Wednesday, Rev. G. Wockenfuss and Rev. H. Stegeman of Culbertson officiating. The remains were placed at the Longview cemetery. Friday 28 Apr 1918

Mrs. T.G. Rees Dies - Sunday afternoon, after a long and gradual decline in health, Mrs. T.G. Rees, passed from this life into the next. During all the years of her sickness she has been most patient and uncomplaining. Mr. and Mrs. Rees came to McCook when the railroad was built to this place, he as chief dispatcher, before there were enough building to accommodate even the railroad employees, and they have made this city their home continuously ever since, except the few years he was agent at Imperial, before he quit active service of the Burlington and moved back here. Mrs. Rees had many devoted friends and she was most highly respected by everyone who knew her. Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon in St. Alban's Episcopal church, of which she was a communicant, Rev. H.J. Johnson, officiating and her body laid to rest in Longview cemetery. The bereaved husband has the heartfelt sympathy of everyone in his sorrow by the passing away of his beloved and life-long companion. Friday 28 Apr 1918

Obituary - Alta Lela Hammell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Hammell of Marion, Nebraska was born near McCook, Nebraska, November 7th, 1905. After long and patient suffering the Savior whom she had learned to trust took her home to be with him on Sunday evening May 5, 1918. She was converted and united with the Baptist church of McCook at ten years of age. She has been a consistent Christian girl and was dearly loved by all who knew her. This was evidenced by the floral offerings which were numerous and beautiful. Brief funeral services were held at the home in Marion for the comfort of a large number of friends who had gathered there and could not accompany the remains to McCook. The remains were then brought to McCook Tuesday afternoon and the regular funeral service was conducted by the pastor of the Baptist Church, Rev. Geo. Lida Sharp. A large audience had assembled to express their sympathy to the bereaved family, so well and favorably known in this community. Interment was made in the Longview cemetery west of the city. Friday 10 May 1918

Bert Briggs Dies - Francis Albert Briggs was born in New Sharon, Iowa, on July 30, 1876. In 1880 he went to Kansas with his parents where they made their home in Oberlin. In 1915 he came with his family to make his home in McCook. He was married on January 16, 1907, to Mary Smith, and to them were born four children of whom three died in infancy. Mr. Briggs was a Spanish-American war veteran, enlisting in the 22d Kansas Volunteers, and at the close of the war was honorably discharged. He immediately reenlisted for service in the Philippines, joining this time the 4th C.S. Volunteers. He spent nearly two years in those islands and was honorably discharged in the late summer of 1900. For nearly two years, Mr. Briggs was in ill health with the disease which on Wednesday, May 15th, terminated in his death. He is survived by his wife, one daughter, his grandmother and one sister. Funeral services were held on Friday morning, May 17th from the residence on 2nd street East, by the Rev. H.C. Seidel, of the Methodist church. Members of the church choir sang several appropriate hymns. The remains were taken to the old home in Oberlin, Kansas where interment was made. Friday 17 May 1918

Obituary - James Patrick Callan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Callan, was born January 30, 1897, at Indianola, Nebraska, where his parents still reside, departed this life, May 25, 1918 at San Antonia, Texas, where he was serving under the colors of Uncle Sam. Joe enlisted as a private at Hastings, Nebr., March 11, 1918, left Indianola, his relatives and friends on March 17, 1918 to do"his bit" for his country. He was stationed at Fort Logan, Colorado, until about April 9, 1918, when he was moved to San Antonio, Texas, with other soldiers to Kelley Field. It having required three days and three nights to make the journey, Joe contracted ear trouble enroute to Texas. After being at Kelley Field but a few days, Joe was taken to Base Hospital No. 1, Ft. Sam Houston, where he in eight days time underwent three operations for masterditis. The last operation he refused to take ether, and his doctor said he stood the operation without a flinch. Everything possible was done by the government for his comfort, and welfare, that money, medical skill and nurses could do, but to no avail. His parents had received a telegram every day stating his condition, until after his father, went down to see him on May 11, and stayed with him until the last, when without a struggle he went into a deep sleep, never more to awaken. Joe was a good boy, well loved and liked by all who knew him, always with a joke and jovial laugh for all. His remains were shipped to Indianola for burial. The funeral services were conducted from the Congregational church by Rev. C.D. Gearhart, of Bertrand, at 2 o'clock Memorial Day and was attended by a large number of friends of the family. His body was laid to rest in the Indianola cemetery. Joe was the first soldier from this vicinity to answer the call of the Lord in this great struggle for humanity and righteousness. He leaves to mourn his departure his father, mother, five brothers and two sisters, a number of other relatives and a host of friends. Card of Thanks - We wish to extend to our many friends and neighbors our sincere thanks for their kind assistance and words of sympathy during the sickness and after the death of our dear son. Friday 7 Jun 1918

Early Settler Dies - The Denver papers announced the death of Mrs. Ada Buck Martin in that city last Saturday, and that her remains were to be shipped to Indianola for burial. The Bucks were among the earliest settlers of this county. Royal Buck and party coming to Red Willow in November, 1871, where they decided to locate. The next spring Royal Buck brought his family from Nebraska City, and settled there, where they lived for many years, finally moving to Denver. Friday 7 Jun 1918

Leon E. Rathke Dies - Leon Rathke, who has been clerking for his uncle in the McCook Grocery for the past year, died Tuesday evening, June 11, 1918, at Dr. Woodruff's hospital. Saturday he was operated upon for appendicitis. His mother, Mrs. A.H. Rathke, arrived from her home in Council Bluffs, Iowa shortly after he had passed away. His body was prepared for burial and taken to Council Bluffs, Wednesday, accompanied by a number of friends for interment. The funeral being held there this afternoon at 2 o'clock. Leon had visited here several times during his summer vacations and since his graduation from the high school in Council Bluffs, with the Class of 1917, he has been working in the grocery store of his uncle and cousin here. He has many friends here, and was deservedly popular among them. The sympathy of everyone is extended to the sorrowing family and relatives. Friday 14 Jun 1918

Dies From Injuries - Thursday of last week William Wallace, who had been working for J.W. McClung & Son, on their stock farm at Indianola, was kicked in the abdomen by a horse, and died from the effects of the injury Saturday morning, June 8, 1918. He was 67 years of age and leaves an invalid wife and two daughters. Friday 14 Jun 1918

Death Calls Two Youths - Henry Culbertson - After several years of suffering death brought relief to Henry, the young son of Mr. and Mrs. H.E. Culbertson, Saturday, July 6, 1918, and ended a life full of ambition and high aims, under an adverse and, what would have been to many, discouraging conditions. Taken ill about six years ago, and submitting to operations that it was hoped would be the means of his recovering his health, he has gradually grown worse until the end came. During all the time he has borne his affliction bravely, and met his friends with a smile and cheerful greeting, when there is, no doubt many would not have been so pleasant to their friends."Hen" as he was familiarly called by all his companions was very popular with all who knew him. He was greatly interested in every kind of sport, and took as active a part in them as possible. He was a good student and prominent in all school activities. He was a member of and graduated with the Class of 1918. Henry Dewey Culbertson was born in McCook, September 6, 1898, and this has always been his home. His illness first became manifest in the spring of 1912. His parents had local physicians attend him, and by their advice took him to specialists in Chicago where he was operated up on, but the disease did not yield to anything that could be done for him. The funeral services were held in the Methodist church Monday afternoon and was attended by a very large number of friends, Rev. H.C. Seidel, officiating. Miss Marjorie Schobel sang a solo"O'er Waiting Harp Strings." Miss Gertrude Pearson playing an obbligato on the violin. The pall bearers: Gerald Elbert, Theodore Barnes, Cloyd Clark, Harold Search, Sheldon Seidel and Frank Rider, were classmates of the deceased. Mrs. Minnie Robson, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Beaubot, of Sutherland; B.L. and E.H. Howat, Mr. and Mrs. Dycas of Hastings; and P.E. Burns, of Denver, relatives of the family and Harvey Culbertson, brother of the deceased, of the Great Lakes training station were in attendance at the funeral. Others, friends of the family, from out of town, who were present were Mr. and Mrs. Brocock and family of Holdrege; and Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Dungan, of Denver. The sincere and heartfelt sympathy of everyone is extended to the family in their sorrow. Friday 12 Jul 1918

Mary B. Ralph - Mary Bell Relph, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Relph, died at her home in Gerver precinct, Thursday, July 4, 1918, after an illness of about seven months. She was born in Gerver precinct, February 18, 1905, where she lived all her life. She endeared herself to those with whom she came in contact by her bright genial disposition, and during all her illness was most patient and thoughtful of others. She is survived by her father, mother, three sisters and four brothers. Funeral services were at her late home Sunday afternoon, Rev. H.C. Seidel, pastor of the Methodist church of this city, officiating, a choir of young people of his church, singing the hymns. Her body was laid to rest in the Pleasant Prairie cemetery near where she had always lived. The sympathy of the whole community and their many friends in this city is extended to the bereaved parents and family. Friday 12 Jul 1918

Little One Taken - The two year old son of Mr. and Mrs. B.L. Langmaid, died Tuesday night, July 16, 1918, of typhoid fever. The body was taken yesterday to Oberlin, Kans., the former home of the parents, for burial. The sympathy of the community goes out to the bereaved parents in their sorrow. Friday 19 Jul 1918

Mrs. Ira H. Harrison Dies - Margaret Jane Erwin was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, on January 28, 1844. With her parents she went to Indiana and Illinois where she spent her early years. In 1885 she moved to a homestead in Red Willow county, Nebraska, which remained her home, until about 1912, when she went to live in Friend, Nebraska. She was married in May, 1857 to Ira H. Harrison who died October 21, 1910. Mrs. Harrison early became a Christian and united with the M.E. church and always lived a consistent Christian life, a woman whose faith in Christ never wavered. She was taken sick about a year ago and everything was done to alleviate her suffering. About three months ago she came to live with her daughter, Mrs. Younger, near Box Elder, where she passed to her eternal reward on Friday, July 12, 1918. She leaves 2 sons, 7 daughters, 45 grandchildren and several great grandchildren. The funeral services were held at the Box Elder M.E. church and were in charge of the Rev. G.E. Martin, the pastor, the Rev. H.C. Seidel, of McCook preaching the sermon, taking his text from Rev. 14: Blessed are the dead which died in the Lord. The music was in charge of several singers from the McCook church. Interment was made in the Box Elder cemetery. Friday 19 Jul 1918

Robt. Traphagan Dies - Monday, July 22, 1918, Robert I. Traphagan died at the General hospital, of typhoid fever from which disease he had been sick for the past few weeks. He has been a resident of this county for about twenty-six years, residing on a farm in Coleman precinct. He retired from active work on the farm a few years ago and bought a residence in this city a couple of months ago. The funeral services were held in St. Patrick's church, Wednesday morning, Father McCullough, O.M.I. officiating, and were attended by a large number of his old neighbors and friends from the county. His remains were buried in Calvary beside those of his wife who preceded him into the life eternal about a year. Obituary - Robert Isaac Traphagan was born in Stark county, Illinois, Sept. 15, 1855, and died at the General hospital here, Monday, July 22, 1918, at 3:50 p.m. He was married to Miss Clara Colgan, Dec. 26, 1877, and to this union were born thirteen children, twelve of them surviving him: Fred Traphagan, George Traphagan, John Traphagan, Mrs. Drusilla Pate, Mrs. Eliza Cain, Robert Traphagan, Edward Traphagan, Mrs. Mary Menig, Joseph Traphagan, Mrs. Anna Cross, Mrs. Rose Nolan, Clara Traphagan, one child having died in infancy. All children were present at the funeral except one son, Corporal Joseph Traphagan, who is now Somewhere in France. Mr. Traphagan moved his wife and family from Illinois to McCook, Neb in 1892, where he resided until last fall, when he moved to Hastings, Nebr., and resided there until about six weeks ago when he returned to McCook. His wife preceded him to The Great Beyond just one short year ago. Besides his twelve children he leaves to mourn his departure 24 grandchildren, 2 sisters, 4 brothers, besides many other relatives and a host of friends. Friday 25 July 1918

Mrs. M.J. Clark Dies - The death of Mrs. M.J. Clark early yesterday morning Thursday, August 8, 1918, was a shock to many of her friends, as but few knew she was ill. Always strong and healthy her brief sickness, followed by death, was a surprise to those who had not learned she was ill. She was taken sick Wednesday night of last week, evidently the result of becoming over-heated, while working in her garden that afternoon, and rapidly grew worse until the end came at 2:30 o'clock yesterday morning. Mrs. Clark was a splendid type of a woman, a great lover of her house, and a fond mother, loyal to her friends and a good neighbor. Mary Harris was born in Illinois, March 3, 1850, her parents were Thomas and Emmaline Harris. They moved to Bremer county, Iowa, when she was a small child. She was married March 14, 1867, to Monroe J. Clark to which union three children were born, the eldest died in infancy, a daughter and son, Mrs. Benj. F. Bowers and Abner Clark, both of this city, survive her, her husband preceded her into the life eternal April 11, 1917. A sister and a brother also survive her, of a family of eight children. They came to McCook in March 1891, where she has since made her home. Mr. and Mrs. Clark celebrated their Golden Wedding anniversary at their home here the month previous of his death. The sorrowing family have the sincere sympathy of the community in the loss of their mother. Funeral services will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at her late home on B Street. Friday 9 Aug 1918

Little Son Dies - Lennus Melvian, the five-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. F.S. Groves, died Tuesday, August 13, 1918, after an illness of but ten days. Funeral services were held Wednesday at the home of G.W. Groves, his grandfather, in this city Wednesday afternoon, and the little body interred in Longview cemetery. The sorrowing parents have the sympathy of all. Friday 16 Aug 1918

Frank Emerson Called - After an illness of but a few weeks Frank Leon Emerson, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Emerson, died at his home, corner C and Second Street East in this city, Tuesday night, August 20, 1918. Frank known by all the young people in this part of the state as"Heap" a nickname given him during his activity in athletics in high school followed him in this vicinity to the end, many not knowing his real name. He was always popular with everyone and especially so with his classmates. He graduated from the McCook high school with the Class of 1913. All of the boys of which are now in the service of their country. He was class treasurer, captain of the baseball club and football team and on the basketball team. He was as fair and honest in sports as he was clean in his personal life. He entered the Dental College of the University of Nebraska, and attended the Denver Dental College the past year, from which he would have graduated next spring. Frank endeavored to enlist at the beginning of the war, but could not pass the physical examination. He was taken seriously ill, about six weeks ago with heart trouble, terminating in dropsy, which was the immediate cause of his death. Frank Leon Emerson was born in McCook, on November 17, 1893, and has lived here all his life. He leaves to mourn his death, thus early in a life filled with hope of a successful future, a father, mother, and two brothers, Clarence is stationed at Ft. Sill, Okla, in the Field Artillery, and a host of friends. Funeral services will be held at his late home this afternoon. Friday 23 Aug 1918

Two Men Drowned - Residents of Red Willow county were startled the fore part of this week when they learned of the news of a sad accident which occurred on Sunday afternoon, when Louis Kreidt and Mike Fritz, two young men residing about 12 miles southeast of Indianola met their death while swimming in a pond in the pasture of Henry Harsh, one of the neighbors of the young men. Kreidt and Fritz, in company with two of their companions, Carl and Herman Bamesberger, had gone to the Harsh pasture to take a swim in the pond, which has been constructed by damming up a canyon, and which is quite deep in places. None of the young men could swim very well and it was when Mr. Fritz undertook to swim across a narrow span of the canyon that the drowning occurred. Before he had reached the opposite bank he either became exhausted or strangled and sank and in the attempt to rescue him by Mr. Kreidt, the two went under. As the Bamesberger boys could not swim they realized that it was but suicide to undertake to recover the unfortunate men and as there was nothing at hand with which to reach them, though they were but a few feet away, the boys were powerless in assisting their companions. The news of the sad accident was soon spread and the bodies of the young men were recovered that evening. Funeral services were conducted at the German Lutheran church south of Bartley on Tuesday afternoon and the bodies interred in the church cemetery. Mr. Kreidt leaves an aged father and one sister, Miss Katie, and Mr. Fritz, is survived by a father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Adam Fritz and one brother, William, and two sisters, Mrs. Geo. Wall, and Miss Ida. Both Mr. Fritz and Mr. Kreidt were well and favorably known by all the people of their neighborhood as well as by many in this city and their departure from life is keenly felt by all their acquaintances, whose sympathy goes out to the grief stricken relatives in their time of great sorrow. Indianola Reporter Friday 23 Aug 1918

Pearl Van Vleet Dies - Miss Pearl Van Vleet, of Danbury, aged 17 years, daughter of Mr. And Mrs. Oscar Van Vleet, of Danbury, who had been in the General hospital here since Thursday of last week, died Wednesday of inflammation of the bowels. Funeral services will be held at her late home in Danbury today. Friday 30 Aug 1918

John Randal Dies Suddenly - The sudden death of John W. Randal Saturday evening shocked everybody in this community. He came to town Friday morning, leaving for home in the afternoon he stopped at his daughter's Mrs. D.T. Spencer, five miles south of town. About three o'clock he was suddenly stricken with paralysis. A physician was immediately sent for and all that medical science could do was given him, lest it was of no avail and he passed away the next evening without regaining consciousness. John Ward Randal was born January 7, 1861, at Lincoln, Illinois. He was married to Miss Lucy E. Murphy at Elkhart, Illinois, January 31, 1888. They came to this county in 1889 and lived on a farm north of town about 3 years, when they moved to the P. Walsh farm, southwest of town; where they lived for twelve years. He bought and moved to the farm in Gerver precinct, where he has since lived. Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Randal, six of whom survive him. His wife died twelve years ago; one of the children died in infancy and Charles died ten years ago. The children still living are: Mrs. D.T. Spencer, Mrs. B.B. Austin, Kathryn, Agnes, Marguerite and John Randal. He is also survived by a brother, Charles H. Randal, of Elkhart, and a sister, Mrs. H.T. Brust, of Springfield, Illinois. The deceased was a fine type of manhood, a most lovable and devoted husband and father, a good neighbor, honest and upright in all his dealings, and highly respected by everyone. His sudden death is much regretted by his many friends and the sincere and heartfelt sympathy goes out to his sorrowing children. Funeral services were held Tuesday morning in St. Patrick's church. Requiem, high mass was celebrated. Rev. A.B. Kunz, O.M.I. officiating, and interment made in Calvary cemetery. Friday 6 Sep 1918

Ted Benjamin Dies - Ted Relph Benjamin, the 17 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry H. Benjamin, died Saturday, September 7, 1918. He was born in the Gerver precinct, November 26, 1900, but his parents moved away in 1902 and have since lived in Canada and in Dawson county. Riverview cemetery in this city. His remains were buried in there Tuesday. Friday 13 Sep 1918

Garry Dole Dies - We just learned that Garry Dole, who formerly lived here, while working in the machine shops, but of late master mechanic on the Alliance division of the Burlington, died at a hospital in Denver last night, following an operation. Friday 13 Sep 1918

Passing of Early Settler - Mrs. W.O. Russell received a message Monday night telling of the death of her father, J.H. McCorkle. Mr. McCorkle, a resident of Red Willow County for many years, passed away in Los Angeles, California, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Frank Huntington Abbott, after an illness of several months. Joseph Hillis McCorkle was born in Indiana, March 19, 1844, died in Los Angeles, September 9, 1918. He was married to Mary Case Paugh in Washington County, Iowa, in 1864. They came to Red Willow County in 1882 and moved to Wyoming in 1894. Mrs. McCorkle died at Burlington, Wyoming, January 18, 1905. Deceased leaves six children to mourn his death and two died in infancy. He was a member of the Civil war. Friday 13 Sep 1918

J.E. Tirrill Dies - John Tirrill was born in Pekin, Illinois on March 7, 1846. He came west in 1885 and settled on a homestead in Red Willow County, Neb., and in 1901 he moved to McCook where he has since lived. He was married to Amanda Dillon in 1867; and was the father of nine children of whom two died. It was in this neighborhood that Mr. Tirrill was converted and united himself with the church which he dearly loved. In the early days of this country he was a preacher and many communities especially in the southern part of the country remember him as the preacher who traveled from place to place to preach the unreachable riches of Christ, in Eternity, many shall rise and call him blessed. For years, Mr. Tirrill had been ill, but last March he had a bad fall which finally made him bed fast. He was of sunny disposition which he maintained through the entire illness; and those who came to see him always went away cheered and better themselves because they had been to see him. When he began to realize that he could not get well, he longed to go home. He went home on Friday morning, September 6th. He leaves his wife, 5 sons, 2 daughters, 23 grandchildren, 2 great-grandchildren, 2 sisters and one brother. Funeral services for which the deceased himself made arrangements were held at the Methodist Episcopal Church on Sunday afternoon, September 7, 1918, the Rev. H.C. Seidel preaching the sermon. The music was in charge of the Sunday School class of Mrs. Fisher's. Interment was in the cemetery several miles south east of McCook where two children of the deceased are resting. Friday 13 Sep 1918

Joseph Schmitz Died - Wednesday afternoon, Joseph Schmitz died suddenly at his home southwest of town, of heart trouble. Though he had been in ill health for about a year, he was able to walk about. Funeral services will be held at the St. Patrick's church tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock. Friday 20 Sep 1918

Matt Colling Dies - Monday of this week, Matt Colling received a telegram announcing that his son, Matt, who was seriously wounded in action, in France, July 27, died the following day, July 28. The parents and family of this brave American have the heartfelt sympathy of everyone in their sorrow, and his name will long be remembered and have a place among the heroes of the country. Friday 4 Oct 1918

Held for Murder - Phillip Webber, a farmer near Culbertson, is under arrest and waiting judgment in the Hitchcock county jail, as the result of the death of E.T. Meyer of Culbertson, the charge being that Meyer died from internal injuries received at the hands of Webber on last Thursday afternoon. It seems that the trouble occurred in the evening at the Webber place when Meyer and his son, George, fifteen years of age, went to the Webber place to inquire as to when Webber intended putting up hay of the Meyer place which he had been farming. According to the story told by the son, George, they entered the house and his father started to talk to Webber about the hay. Webber said he would put it up when he got ready and the boy's father reminded Webber of the contract between them. This caused Webber and his wife to become very angry and Mrs. Webber picking up the coffee pot threatened them if they did not leave the house. The father and his son upon leaving were followed into the yard by Webber where a fight took place Meyer being knocked down, then tromped and kicked into a stage of unconsciousness after which Webber took the remainder of his spite out on the son by striking him several blows."When he realized what he had done" says the boy"he grabbed a bucket and ran to the tank where he got some water and throwing it at my father he rushed into the house. I refilled the bucket and worked with my father for some time before he regained consciousness, then I helped him to get home, and we called the doctor, the next day he was taken to the hospital in McCook." Mr. Meyer passed away at the General hospital in this city Tuesday at noon, Dr. Ried giving as the cause internal injuries. He was a man fifty-three years of age and the father of two sons and two daughters; George 16; Carrol 14; Alice 11, and Robert 7, all of whom are left to mourn his death besides a wife and two brothers. The deceased had resided on the farm just east of Culbertson for two years, moving to Culbertson from a farm northeast of McCook where he located in 1905 when coming west from Thayer county. Funeral services were conducted last Wednesday from the Methodist church of McCook and the body placed in Longview cemetery. Friday 4 Oct 1918

Dr. Reid Dies Suddenly - Stricken by Apoplexy When Leaving Office Yesterday Afternoon - Dies in about half hour - In his daughter's apartments, adjoining his office. Attack came at head of stairway as he was leaving to make sick call. - The sudden death of Dr. D.J. Reid from a stroke of apoplexy on Monday afternoon about 2:30 o'clock was a shock to everyone in the community. He was just leaving his office to make a sick call was talking to two men who had been in the office and just started down the stairs when he grasped the hand rail and began to sink down. The men behind him caught him and prevented his falling, seated him on the top step. His wife and partner Dr. Swaggart were called and both hurried to his assistance. He was taken into his daughter's Mrs. W.E. Cook apartments and laid on the bed. Everything possible was done for him but without avail and he passed away in about half an hour without being able to speak. David J. Reid was born in Lynn County, Iowa, December 6, 1876; died October 10, 1918. He was married to Miss Sarah Harvey at Arapahoe, August 1, 1894, to them two daughters were born; Mrs. Hazel Sullivan and Mrs. Muriel Cook. He graduated from the medical college of the University of Nebraska in the class of 1902. He began practice in Crab Orchard and after several years he moved to Holbrook, opened a hospital there and made surgery a specialty. Later moved to Cambridge and started a hospital there. After four years he sold to Dr. Kee and came to McCook and started a hospital here, and has been very successful, and is probably one of the best known surgeons in this part of the country. His patients coming here from long distances. His practice was very extensively and being one of the last, examining board he had been working unusually hard and many extra hours each day. It is thought that over work was the cause of his sudden death. Besides his wife and two daughters he is survived by his Father, two brothers and a foster sister. Funeral services will be held at the Methodist church, Sunday afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock. Friday 11 Oct 1918

Brought Here for Burial - The body of T.R. Benjamin arrived here this morning from Kansas City, where he died in a hospital following an operation. Mr. Benjamin was at one time a conductor on the Burlington but for the past several years has been in the real estate business in St. Francis. Friday 18 Oct 1918

Many Passing Away - Death is Reaping a Great Harvest Everywhere Now - Some McCook Citizens Called - This week and Many More Sick with the"Flu", Precautions Being Taken to Prevent the Disease from Spreading - Mrs. Guy Brooks - Mrs. H. Guy Brooks died at her home in this city, Sunday afternoon, October 13, 1918, after an illness of about two weeks. Caroline Irene Cathcart was born in Decatur, Kansas, October 18, 1888. She came to Nebraska with her parents when quite small and has lived in this county ever since and her home has been in and near McCook for the past fifteen years. She was a successful teacher in the rural schools of the county for seven terms and taught one year in the Stratton schools. She was married to H. Guy Brooks, April 12, 1912 in this city, and is the mother of a daughter and son, Myra Jane, aged 4 years and Guy, Jr., aged 6 months. Mrs. Brooks was an energetic young woman, full of sympathy for everyone and always ready and willing to do what she could to make them happier. She is survived, besides her husband, and two children, by her father, N.P. Cathcart, two sisters, Mrs. John Elias, of Denver, and Mrs. Will Cassell of Oxford, and two brothers, R.C. Cathcart of Greeley, and R.H. Cathcart, of Denver, all of whom attended the funeral services. Mr. and Mrs. G.A. Brooks and daughter, Miss Mary, of Holyoke, Colo., and Mrs. Grace Cassell, of Republican, Nebr., a father, mother and sisters of the bereaved husband, attended the funeral services Thursday. Funeral services were held yesterday afternoon, Rev. H.J. Johnson, rector of St. Alban's Episcopal church, of which the deceased was a communicant, officiated, and her body was laid to rest beside her mother in Longview cemetery. By request of the mother, her sister, Mrs. John Elias, of Denver, has taken the two little children to her home to care for. The heartfelt sympathy of everyone is extended to the husband and little children at their great loss. Friday 18 Oct 1918

R.L. Okerson - About noon today, R.L. Okerson died at the hospital, to where he had been taken but a short time before for treatment for the influenza. He leaves a widow and two children. Mr. Okerson was widely known in this part of the state, having owned a shop and worked at the barber trade in this city for a number of years. Friday 18 Oct 1918

Miss Maud McMillen - After an illness of about ten days Miss Maud McMillen died yesterday afternoon, Thursday, October 17, 1918, at her home 323 Main Avenue. Miss Maud McMillen was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A.A. McMillen, she was born in Centerville Pennsylvania, November 25, 1875, and came to Nebraska in the spring of 1888. They lived on a farm just east of McCook for a time and then moved into town where they have since lived. For a number of years Miss McMillen has been employed in DeGroff Co.'s store having supervision of the millinery department and for several months has been manager of the ladies ready-to-wear and millinery department. She became a member of the Reformed Church before leaving Pennsylvania and there being no church of that denomination here, she with her parents, put her letter into and became a member of the Congregational Church. She was a consistent member and Christian all her life and made and held many friends by her pleasant and ladylike manners. She will be greatly missed in church and special circles. The bereaved mother and sister, who survive her, have the sincere sympathy of everyone in their sorrow. Friday 18 Oct 1918

Hutch Taylor - Hutch N. Taylor, son of Supt. and Mrs. C.W. Taylor, of Lincoln, Nebr., aged 14, died at home Sunday afternoon, October 15, 1918. The funeral will be held there this Friday afternoon. Capt. Taylor was on duty at Camp Hancock, Georgia, and came home to attend the funeral. The deceased and his parents are well known here. They having lived here several years while Capt. Taylor was superintendent of the city schools going from here to a professorship in the State University. The family have the sincere sympathy of their many friends here in sorrow. Friday 18 Oct 1918

Ralph M. Simmons - We learn that Ralph M. Simmons, who, has been very ill the past week with influenza, died this morning, at the hospital. He leaves a widow and three children, two sons and a daughter. Friday 18 Oct 1918

Word was received here today that Mrs. Harry Shield, daughter of W.C. Bullard, formerly of this city, died at her home in Omaha, this morning. Friday 18 Oct 1918

Knud Stangland - Tuesday word was received here by Mr. and Mrs. K.K. Stangland that their son, Knud, had died at his home at Havelock, of influenza, after an illness of a week. The deceased was born June 25, 1875 at Mankato, Minnesota, and when but a small boy his parents moved to McCook where he grew to manhood, and learned the machinists trade in the Burlington shops here. He was married to Miss Edna Dixon, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C.A. Dixon, in this city, October 24, 1901, to which union a daughter was born. They moved to California where he worked at his trade for some time then returned to Denver, and about a month ago moved to Havelock to again work for the Burlington. Deceased was a splendid young man and expert at his trade, and had many friends here. He leaves to mourn his sudden death, a widow, a daughter, his father, mother, and three sisters, Mrs. Ira J. Clark, of Denver, Mrs. L.T. Palley, of Minden and Mrs. Raymond J. Poole, of Lincoln. His body was brought here Wednesday night. Funeral services were held at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. K.K. Stangland, yesterday afternoon, Rev. H.C. Seidel, of the Methodist church, of which the deceased was a member, officiating, and his body interred in Longview cemetery under the auspices of the Masonic lodge of this city. Friday 18 Oct 1918

W.G. Dungan - W.G. Dungan assistant superintendent for the Burlington, died Tuesday morning, October 22, 1918 at 12:30 at his home in Deadwood, South Dakota, after an illness of several days with the influenza. His body was taken to Minden, Nebraska for burial. The funeral services to be held there today. The deceased began working for the Burlington in Lincoln. He was roadmaster and trainmaster at Orleans, was promoted to trainmaster here at McCook, and then to superintendent of the Sterling Colorado division and then assistant superintendent at Deadwood, S.D. Mr. Dungan made many friends while living in McCook and was highly esteemed by all with whom he came in contact. He is survived by his wife and six children who have the sincere sympathy of their many friends in their sad affliction. Friday 25 Oct 1918

Fred Fahrenbruck - Wednesday night October 23, 1918 Fred Fahrenbruck died at his home from influenza. He was employed in the freight depot and was the son of Carl Fahrenbruck. Friday 25 Oct 1918

Mrs. Henry Hoff - Died last night at her home in West McCook of the influenza, and her husband is suffering from the same disease and is quite sick. Friday 25 Oct 1918

George Latourette - Word was received here yesterday that George LaTourette, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, eldest son of Mr. And Mrs. W.C. LaTourette, formerly of this city, died there Wednesday. He leaves a widow and two children. Mr. LaTourette lived in this city in the early days and ran a a hardware store which he sold to H.P. Waite & Co., when he moved to Cedar Rapids. Friday 25 Oct 1918

Mrs. Ross Osborn - Tuesday night, October 22, 1918, Mrs. Ross Osborn, of West McCook, died at the General Hospital of influenza after a short illness. Funeral services were held yesterday afternoon, Rev. H.C. Seidel, officiating, and her body was laid in rest in Riverview cemetery. Mrs. Iona Osborn was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Steinmetz and has lived in McCook since childhood, and was highly esteemed by every one who knew her. She is survived by her husband and her mother, who have the sympathy of everyone in their sorrow. Friday 25 Oct 1918

K.F. Pape, foreman of the bridge and buildings paint gang, on this division of the Burlington was brought to the General Hospital from Brush the first of the week suffering with the influenza and died Wednesday morning. His parents in Marietta, Ohio, were notified. His father and mother arrived last night and will take his body back to Ohio for burial. Friday 25 Oct 1918

Mrs. J.M. Millard - Mrs. J. M. Millard died Monday morning at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Neilson of influenza. She and her son came from Hastings a few months ago to join her husband and make their home here. Hazel Wauneta Hall Millard was born in Madison, Nebraska, August 19, 1887 and passed away Monday morning, October 21, 1918, at the age of 31 years, 2 months, and 2 days. She was united in marriage with J.M. Millard April 28, 1907, one child being born to them, George Jerard, aged 13 years. Departed is survived by her husband and son, together with her father, George Hall, brothers Wilbur and Albert Hall, all of Fremont, Nebr. Mrs. Millard became a Christian early in life and passing away trusting fully in her Savior. The father and brother, Wilbur were present at the funeral. Funeral services were conducted at Longview cemetery, Wednesday afternoon, by Rev. A.L. Zink, pastor of the Christian church. The heartfelt sympathy of all goes out to the bereft husband and little son. Friday 25 Oct 1918

Many More Called - Epidemic Takes Several More This Week - Harvey McMillen - After an illness of two weeks, Harvey McMillen died at his home Sunday, October 20, 1918. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. H.C. Seidel, pastor of the Methodist church, at Longview cemetery. The following is the obituary read at the service: J. Harvey McMillen, eldest son of C.W. and Olive McMillen, was born on April 22, 1897, at Hubbell, Nebr. In 1903 he came to McCook with his parents and has since made his home here. When a boy of 12 years Harvey professed conversion and united himself with the Methodist church of which he was a member at the time of his decease. On June 19, 1917, Harvey enlisted in the United States army and later in the summer went to camp in Deming, New Mexico. On February 20, 1918 on account of physical disability was honorably discharged from the service and not recommended for reenlistment. This was a great disappointment to the young man, so when on June 5, 1918, he registered as one who has reached his majority he immediately requested that he be placed in Class 1A so that he might be one of the first to be called. He was however, destined never to see service again, much as his heart was set on it. He was taken ill about October 6, and obliged to take to his bed on the 11th. He fell asleep on earth, leaving great consolation for his loved ones, and woke up in Eternity on Sunday morning, October 20, 1918. He leaves his parents, four brothers and four sisters. The pall-bearers were boy friends of the departed: John Dulany, Harry Kummer, Glen Harbaugh, Ed Daughterl, Robert Lewis and Grant Watkins. Friday 25 Oct 1918

Obituary - Radford Henry Pate first saw the light of day in Sodas Centre, Wayne county, N.Y., on August 22, 1847. When a young man he went West, settling in Illinois where he lived until about 1875, when he came to Nebraska, where he settled near Seward, and in 1883 took a homestead in Red Willow county. This remained his home until his decease. He was married on May 1, 1870 to Cordelia Cain, by whom he was the father of 7 children. She passed from this life in 1903. Mr. Pate was a member of the Church of Christ but never transferred his membership to this western country. Several years ago he was stricken with paralysis, but the sickness that culminated in his death in the early morning hour of August 17 came about two weeks ago. He is survived by 4 sons, 3 daughters, 29 grandchildren, 2 great grandchildren, one brother, and one sister. Funeral services were held at the Baptist church on Sunday afternoon August 18, 1918, conducted by the Rev. H.C. Seidel, the church choir singing several appropriate hymns. Interment was in Filley, Nebraska. Friday 25 Oct 1918

Lloyd Rodgers - Lloyd Rodgers the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Rodgers, of Denver, died at the home of his parents in that city, Sunday night about 12 o'clock, of pneumonia. The deceased was born in this city and lived here until his parents moved to Denver. Mr. and Mrs. Rodgers are remembered by the older residents of McCook, they having lived here for many years during which time Mr. Rodgers was road master for the Burlington. The other son is in the army. The sympathy of all their friends go out to the bereaved parents in their sorrow. Friday 25 Oct 1918

Walter Roedel - Tuesday the influenza claimed another young man in this city, and took from his family Walter Roedel, after a brief illness. For several years he clerked in various stores in the city and then passed the civil service examination for postal clerk and since then has been working in the post office. He was an ambitious, conscientious man, and won the respect of all by his manly and exemplary ways. He leaves to mourn his death a widow and two small children. Funeral services were held yesterday afternoon, conducted by Rev. F. Sattler and his remains buried in Longview cemetery. The sincere sympathy of everyone goes out to the grief stricken widow and family. Friday 25 Oct 1918

Mrs. C.O. Rodgers - Mrs. C.O. Rodgers who has been seriously ill with the influenza died last night. She leaves to mourn her demise, her husband and two children. Friday 25 Oct 1918

Mrs. Schissler - Monday morning Mrs. M.S. Schissler died of the influenza. Her husband, who is in the army arrived a few hours after her death. Short funeral services were held at the cemetery at Herndon, Kansas, where her body was taken for burial. Rev. H.C. Seidel, of this city, officiating. Friday 25 Oct 1918

Mrs. Enfield - Mrs. Retta Enfield died at her home in West McCook of influenza, Sunday, October 27, 1918. Retta May Schamel was born in Illinois and came to this county with her parents, Mr. And Mrs. Henry Schamel, went quite young. She is survived by four daughters, her mother, father, four brothers and two sisters. Funeral services were held in Longview cemetery, Wednesday afternoon, Rev. A.L. Zink officiating. Friday 1 Nov 1918

Roy Cathcart - Roy C. Cathcart died at his home in Denver, Saturday, October 26, 1918, of influenza. He had been called to this city just the week before to attend the funeral of his sister, Mrs. Guy Brooks who also died of influenza and he was taken ill just after returning home. His wife and two children are also ill, and his father died here Tuesday night. The deceased will be remembered by many citizens having clerked in various stores here before going to Colorado. Friday 1 Nov 1918

Ole G. Coppom - Tuesday morning most of the citizens of McCook were painfully surprised at the news of the death of Ole G. Coppom, but few knowing he was sick. He had been ill with the influenza but a week when the end came, and his wife is still a sufferer with the same disease. His remains were taken to Holbrook Wednesday morning for burial. He is survived by his wife and daughter, Miss Inez Coppom. Friday 1 Nov 1918

Mrs. Ben Lytle - Mrs. Ben Lytle died at one of the hospitals in the city Saturday, October 26, 1918 of the influenza. Rebecca Johnson was born in Boone county, Iowa, March 2, 1863 and moved to this county when but a young girl. She was married in April 1888 to Benjamin Lytle, who died October 24, 1915. She was the mother of three children, two sons and a daughter, the latter dying in infancy. She is survived by the two sons, Albert Warren and James Opal and three sisters, Mrs. F.G. Lytle, of McCook, Mrs. A.E. Dixon of Alma, and Mrs. Geo. Armstead of Sioux Rapids, Iowa. Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at Box Elder, Rev. H.C. Seidel officiating and her body buried in the Box Elder cemetery. Friday 1 Nov 1918

Mrs. P.K. Reed - Wednesday night, October 30, 1918, Mrs. Philip K. Reed, died at her home in the Walsh block from the influenza. Virginia M. Nurdin and Phillip K. Reed were married August 1, 1918, in this city and was a niece of C.A. DeLoy. She is survived by her husband, father, two brothers, four sisters, her foster parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Nurdin, of Oxford. Her remains were taken to Orleans for burial. Friday 1 Nov 1918

Killed in a Collision - Edwin Somerville Dies at Camp Grant, Illinois, From Injuries - The word that Edwin Somerville had been killed in the collision of two auto trucks, one of which he was driving, at Camp Grant, Ill., was received by his parents here early Tuesday morning. The news was a most painful surprise to his many friends and those of the family. Edwin was driving an army truck from camp to Rockford. He was accompanied by Bert Goodenberger whose home is in the southern part of the county. At a narrow crossing they met another truck. The two collided and Edwin sustained injuries from which he died shortly after. The body will be sent home under an escort for burial here. The heartfelt sympathy of everyone goes out to the sorrowing family. Friday 1 Nov 1918

Eric Ray - Eric Ray died last week at Ft. Douglas, Salt Lake City, Utah of pneumonia after a short illness. His parents Mr. and Mrs. George Ray, of this city were notified he was seriously ill and immediately went to him, and returned Monday with the body of their son. Eric Ray at the time of his induction into the army was a machinist in the railroad shops here and was a splendid young man popular with his fellow workmen and a good mechanic. His death will be keenly felt by his family and many friends. Funeral services were held at his late home on second street west, Tuesday afternoon, Rev. A.B. Kunz, O.M.I. Officiating and his remains interred in Calvary cemetery. Friday 8 Nov 1918

Lawrence E. Mitchell - Friday night, November 1, 1918, after a short illness for influenza Lawrence Mitchell died at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Russ Mitchell, in West McCook. Lawrence was born in this city on December 18, 1887 and has lived here all his life. He is survived by his father, mother, three brothers and six sisters; all were present at the services except James who is in France. Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon in Riverview cemetery where his body was buried, Rev. H.C. Seidel officiating. Friday 8 Nov 1918

Harvest of Grim Reaper - Death Visits Many Homes The Past Week - Influenza on the Decrease - Most of Those Now Afflicted with the Disease are now on the Road to Recovery, New Cases Not so Many - Perry Cathcart - Tuesday night, October 29, 1918 after a week's illness, A. Perry Cathcart died at the Cooperative hospital of influenza. His son, Ray, of Denver, Colo., died of the same disease last Saturday, and his daughter, Mrs. Irene Brooks died here the week before. Funeral services were held yesterday afternoon at the grave in Longview cemetery, C.W. Barnes officiating. Alexander Perry Cathcart was born near Punxsutawney, Jefferson county, Pa, June 6, 1854. His parents moved to Illinois in 1857. In 1872 they moved to the eastern part of Nebraska. He was married to Miss Almira C. Marks in Concordia, Kansas, September 13, 1876. Two sons, Roy and Ray, and three daughters, Mrs. Oma Elms of Denver, Mrs. Edna Cassell of Oxford, and the late Mrs. Irene Brooks of this city, were born to this union. Mrs. Cathcart died at their home south of McCook, eight years ago. Mrs. Irene Brooks died October 13, 1918. Roy died at his home in Denver, October 27, 1918 and the father on the 27th. He has lived in this county for over twenty years during which time he followed his trade as a plasterer. He was widely known and popular among his acquaintances. His brothers, Joseph M. Cathcart of Talmage, Nebr., his sister, Mrs. D. Graham of Julian, Nebr. And nephew A.C. Cathcart of Oberlin, Kansas and Craig Cathcart, of Norcatur, Kans., besides his daughter, Mrs. Oma Elms of Denver and Mr. And Mrs. Will Cassell, of Oxford, attended the funeral. Roll and his family are all sick at Greeley, Colo. The sympathy of everyone is extended to the stricken family. Friday 11 Nov 1918

Death Calls More Citizens - Mrs. A.G. Bump - After many months of suffering, and when medical and surgical skill had failed to restore health and strength to the body, Mrs. A.G. Bump died at her home on second street East early Tuesday morning, November 5, 1918. Mrs. Bump was one of those people who endeavors to make life more pleasant to those who are in sorrow, the world better that she lived and she succeeded. She was a friend to everyone, a helpful, sympathetic one to those in need a comforter in the time of sorrow and a happy genial companion and friend at all times. Her death takes from this community one who will be missed and mourned by many. Mollie Beatrice Adamson was born in Newton Iowa on September 27, 1865. In 1888 she came to Nebraska, where she first made her home in Fremont and a year later come to McCook where she has since lived. She was married to Albert C. Bump on December 19, 1888. Mrs. Bump was a woman of sterling qualities, true and loyal to the core and worthy of all confidence placed in her. She was born in a Quaker home and all her life was a member of the Friend's Church having never severed her connection with that church. She was also a member of the local chapter of the Eastern Star. She was sick for a long time but patiently bore her trouble without complaint until last April when she was obliged to seek medical aid. The heartfelt and sincere sympathy of everyone is extended to the bereaved husband and her relatives. Funeral services will be held in Longview cemetery this afternoon, Rev. H.C. Seidel to officiate. Friday 11 Nov 1918

Mrs. C.W. Britt - Tuesday, word was received here that Mrs. Charles W. Britt had died Monday, October 28, 1918, at her home in St. Joseph Mo., of paralysis and her remains would be sent here for burial. The services were held in Longview cemetery Wednesday afternoon Rev. F. Sattler officiating. Ellington Wilson was born July 26, 1874, in Ohio. She and her mother, Mrs. Clara Wilson, came to McCook in 1890. She was married to Charles W. Britt in Lincoln, December 15, 1902, a little son blessed this union but lived only a couple of months. During her residence here, Mrs. Britt was a leader in social and musical circles and was greatly missed when they moved to St. Joseph a few years ago. The husband and her mother have the sympathy of all in their sorrow. Friday 11 Nov 1918

Harry Godfrey - Harry Godfrey died Saturday nite October 26, 1918, at the General hospital, of influenza. Deceased has lived here practically all his life. For some time he has been in the employ of the McCook Electric Co., as an engineer at the power plant, and is highly esteemed by all who knew him. Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon and was attended by his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Godfrey and three brothers of Colorado. Friday 11 Nov 1918

Death's Doings - Harry Nolan Dies - William Harry Nolan, another victim of the influenza, died Saturday, November 9, 1918, at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. L.C. Nolan of this city. The deceased was born in Hastings, Nebr., July 6, 1893. His parents moved to a farm in Frontier county north of this city in 1897, where he has lived ever since, and when his parents moved to this city a couple of years ago, he took charge of the farm. He was a splendid young man in every way, and full of energy and ambition. He was successful in business, and highly respected by everyone. He is survived by his mother, father, two brothers and four sisters and many friends. The bereaved family have the sympathy of everyone in their sorrow. Funeral services were held here Monday afternoon, Rev. A.L. Zink of the Christian Church officiating, and his body buried in Riverview cemetery. Friday 11 Nov 1918

Mrs. Robert Hockett - Mrs. Robert Hockett, formerly of this county died at her home near Lusk, Wyoming, of influenza on Friday night, November 8, 1918. Her body was brought to this city Tuesday, accompanied by her mother, and sister for burial. Mr. Hockett also was ill with the same disease, but was getting better at that time. Mrs. Hockett was the daughter of Mr. And Mrs. Albert Ebert of this city. She is survived by her husband and two children, father, mother, and four sisters and four brothers. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Mr. Christie of Lincoln, and the body interred in the Riverview cemetery. Friday 18 Nov 1918

W.H. Ackerman - Word was received here by friends the latter part of last week that W.H. Ackerman died at his home in Dudley, Missouri, on October 25, 1918. The deceased was a resident of this city for many years where he had been owner of a livery and sales stables and after disposing of that business opened a real estate office which he continued until he moved to Dudley, Mo. He will long be remembered by all who knew him as a most genial, honest man, who has a host of friends here. Friday 18 Nov 1918

Brother Died at Oxford - A. N. Schultz, brother of E.H. Schultz of this city died at his home near Oxford, Thursday, November 3, 1918, of influenza. He leaves a widow and three children. He and his wife were taken ill with several other relatives. They were there attending the funeral of his sister, Mrs. Henry Huff, who died in McCook and whose body was taken to Oxford for burial. E.H. Schultz goes there to care for his late brother's farm and stock for the present. Friday 18 Nov 1918

Ray Bayless Dies - Word was received here Wednesday, by Mrs. Chapman that her son, Ray S. Bayless had died of influenza Wednesday morning, November 20, 1918, at San Pedro, California. Ray enlisted in the navy about eight years ago and when his time had expired had twice reenlisted. The past summer he had a thirty-day furlough, most of the time he spent with his mother, renewing old acquaintances and made many new ones. He had many interesting stories to tell of his travels and experiences. He liked the navy and was advancing in the ranks at the time of his death he was a chief of the submarine base at Ft. McArthur, San Pedro, California. The body is expected to arrive here Sunday evening. Funeral services will be held Monday afternoon and his remains taken to Red Cloud Tuesday for burial. He is survived by his mother and brother, Roy, enlisted in the army shortly after the war was declared and assigned to a band which was sent to Honolulu. He finished an officers training school there and was lately transferred to Camp Grant, Illinois, where he now is and is expected to be here for the funeral. The mother and brother have the heartfelt sympathy of everyone in their deep sorrow. Roy Bayless, came home from Camp Grant, Illinois, to attend the funeral of his brother Ray Bayless, of the U.S. Navy, who died in California. Roy had been in Honolulu since his enlistment until a few weeks ago, he having attended an officers training school there. He was given a commission and transferred to Camp Grant. Roy is in fine health and seems to like army life, at least what he has seen of it. Friday 22 Nov 1918

Mrs. Ollie Colling died at Phoenix Arizona, Wednesday, where she had gone some time ago in hopes the change in climate would be beneficial to her health. Deceased was a sister of George A. Whittaker of this city, her maiden name being Mabel Whittaker, of this city. Her remains accompanied by her husband and children will be brought to Indianola for burial. Friday 22 Nov 1918

J.E. Farrell, died of influenza at his home near Lebanon Sunday. He was the eldest son of Mr. And Mrs. James Farrell, of this city. He is survived by his wife and little daughter. The bereaved family and parents have the sympathy of everyone in their sorrow. Friday 22 Nov 1918

C.C. Heskett Dies - While working in a field on his farm northwest of town Tuesday afternoon, loading feed on a wagon, C.C. Heskett was stricken with paralysis. A neighbor passing by the field, noticed the team wandering about and went to investigate the cause. He found the body of Mr. Heskett from which life had departed but shortly before as the body was still warm. He took the remains to the Wm. Hammell farm and notified the family and called a physician. The deceased was about 60 years of age. Funeral services will be held this afternoon at the Christian church, Rev. A.L. Zink officiating, and interment under auspices of the Modern Woodmen, of which order he was a member. The bereaved widow, and children have the sympathy of the community in their sorrow. Friday 22 Nov 1918

John Hoff Dies - Last night John Hoff, of Southwest McCook died after a short illness of influenza. He is survived by his widow and three children, who have the heartfelt sympathy of the community in their sorrow. Friday 22 Nov 1918

A Mother Dies - Mrs. John Roth, of South McCook, died at her home Wednesday night, November 20, 1918, of the influenza aged 24. She leaves to mourn her death a husband and four small children who have the sympathy of everyone in their affliction. Friday 22 Nov 1918

Buried Here - The body of Mrs. Walter Enders who died of the influenza last week at her home near Palisade was brought here for burial Saturday. Services were held in St. Patrick's church and her remains interred in the Calvary cemetery last Saturday. Mrs. Enders was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Con Snell of this city, and had many friends here, all of whom extend their sincere sympathy to the bereft husband and her family. Mr. Enders was also suffering from the same disease at the time of his wife's death. Friday 29 Nov 1918

Mrs. Claud W. Schmitz - This community was shocked Monday morning, by the word coming to relatives that Mrs. Claud Schmitz had died in Denver that morning. The deceased, who was Alice Moore had been married just two weeks previously, and she and her husband were away on their wedding trip and were traveling by auto. No one here knew she was sick and the startling news of her death was a most severe shock to her family. The young husband and her family have the sympathy of all in their sorrow. Friday 29 Nov 1918

Brice Q. Jones - Last night, November 28, 1918, after suffering with the influenza for over two weeks died at his home. Brice Jones has lived here nearly all his life and has many friends who will deeply regret his death. He is survived by his wife, who was Blanch Bowen. She also is quite ill with the same disease. His father, mother, sister and two brothers survive him. Friday 29 Nov 1918

More Influenza Victims - Epidemic Still Rages All Over the Country - William E. Wiehe - After an illness of but a week with the influenza, Will Wiehe succumbed to the prevailing epidemic and died Tuesday, November 26, 1918, at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A.C. Wiehe. His wife who had been visiting her parents in Lincoln was also suffering from the same disease there but when notified of her husband's serious condition came home Monday. The deceased has lived in this city practically all his life, and was a young man of most excellent character and had a host of friends. He is survived by a widow, a son, aged five years, his father, mother and sister, Mrs. Neal Quick of Indianola. The sympathy of everyone is extended to the sorrowing families in their bereavement. Funeral services were held yesterday afternoon at the home of his parents. Friday 29 Nov 1918

Obituary - Brice Q. Jones was born March 11, 1891, in Verdon, Richardson county, Nebraska. Died in McCook, Thursday, November 28, 1918. His parents moved to this county when he was three years old, where he has since lived, and received his education in the McCook Schools. For several years he has been employed in the office of Easter day & Reid, grain and coal dealers. He was married to Miss Blanche Bowen daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Bowen of this city, on June 6, 1916. At the time of his death he was a member of the I.O.O.F. and Modern Woodman of America orders, and of the Congregational church, and an active member of the various church societies. He had not been in good health for the past year and in his condition succumbed easily to the prevailing epidemic. He is survived by his wife, father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Jones, of this city, two brothers, a sister and many friends. Funeral services were held Saturday, Rev. Louis Hieb, officiating, in Longview cemetery. Friday 6 Dec 1918

J.H. Keever Dies - After suffering for a long time with rheumatism, J.H. Keever, died at the home of Mr. And Mrs. D.C. Marsh, Saturday, November 30, 1918. The deceased and wife has been living for some time at the Marsh home. Mrs. Marsh and Mrs. Keever being sisters. The body was taken to Superior Saturday for burial. Friday 6 Dec 1918

Mrs. Euphemia Jones Dies - Monday evening December 2, 1918 after an illness of about a month, Mrs. Euphemia C. Jones passed away at the home of Dr. C.M. Duncan. Although she had been in ill health for several months she was taken sick with the influenza about a month ago and had recovered sufficiently to walk around when she had a relapse, resulting in pneumonia, which was the immediate cause of her death. Euphemia Callia Garrison was born on November 13, 1850 in Barren county, Kentucky. She was married to Joel T. Jones, April 5, 1884 at Bowling Green, Kentucky. She was a member of the Eastern Star, Rebekahs and the Knights and Ladies of Security orders. When a girl she united with the Presbyterian church, has always been an active member in that organization and in her daily life was a consistent Christian who was most highly esteemed by all who knew her. She and her family moved to McCook from Humbolt, Nebraska, her husband dying here in 1914, and has made her home in this city since then. She is survived by a daughter and son, Mrs. M.C. Shurtleff and Thomas Miles Jones, and a brother, S.R. Garrison, all of whom reside here. Her remains were taken to Edgar, Nebraska, Tuesday night, accompanied by her family where the funeral services were held the next day, and her body laid to rest by the side of her husband's remains. The sympathy of the community is extended to her sorrowing children and brother at their loss. Friday 6 Dec 1918

Captain Writes to Father - Battery"C", 339th Field Artillery Saint Amant Tallende, France, October 31, 1918 - Mr. George Elbert, McCook, Nebr. My Dear Mr. Elbert: It is my duty to confirm the report which you have already received from the War Department of the death of your son George at Saint Amant Tallende, France on October 31, 1918. Always fighting against death with that same spirit of determination which has characterized his life since I have known your son was nevertheless finally overcome by the epidemic of bronchial pneumonia which has claimed the lives of a many soldiers and civilians in the past months. Since your son joined the battery he has always stood out amongst the rest of the men as a better gent than the average, his habit of industry and his clean life would have carried him farther than a soldier. His good work in the battery has won for him the grade of Corporal and I had high hopes of soon being able to make him a Sargeant. I regret exceedingly that his death should have occurred during the training period rather than on the battlefield. The supreme sacrifice of his life for the honor of his country and humanity is the finest tribute to his patriotism and his high ideals of manhood. His memory will always be with the officers and the men of this battery and the thought of his sacrifice will always give us an incentive to do our duty as well ad as loyally as he did his. I extend to you the heartfelt sympathy of the battery in your loss. It is just such men as your son who are making our great National Army an invincible power for the right. Even in your sorrow you can justly be proud of such a son as yours who has so cheerfully given his life for his country in her hour of need. Yours truly, Kendall Winship Captain 339th F.A. Commanding Battery"C" Friday 6 Dec 1918

Gene Eisenhart Dies - Eugene Eisenhart of Culbertson who had been in the General hospital here the past week very low with influenza for a week, died last night about 7 o'clock. Eugene was employed at the Citizen Bank in this city for several years, and was a member of the famous McCook Band for a much longer period, and he was considered one of the McCook boys. He was one of the very popular young men of this city and the number of his friends was limited only by those who were acquainted with him. He was a most genial, courteous and accommodating young man. He was married to Miss Julia Solomon about two years ago. For the past several years has been employed in his father's bank in Culbertson but made frequent visits to this city keeping in touch with his many friends here. His young wife has the sympathy of everyone in her sorrow. Friday 6 Dec 1918

Nellie Virginia Hansen Dies - Nellie Virginia Hansen was born January 28, 1900, age 18 years, 10 months, and 2 days. Death occurred November 30, at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hans Hansen, sixteen miles, north of McCook, Nebr. in Frontier County. At this place she was born and grew to womanhood. This is the passing of another young life. Nellie enjoyed a large circle of friends both young and old, and was loved by all who knew her. A cheerful loving disposition, very active in her social life and ready and willing to help those around her. At the time of her death she was a student of the McCook Business college. She leaves to mourn her departure a father, mother, two sisters and five brothers. One brother, Chris, preceding her about two months previous being killed in action while serving his country. The parents, brothers and sisters have the heartfelt sympathy of everyone in their deep sorrow. Another hand in beckoning us, Another call is given. And glows once more with Angel steps, The path which reaches Heaven. Funeral services were held at the Zion Hill Cemetery conducted by the Rev. H.C. Seidel. Friday 6 Dec 1918

Father and Two Children Die - Henry Webber, who lived on the Barbazette farm southwest of this city died at the General hospital Thursday night, November 28, 1918. He, with his wife and two children were suffering from a severe attack of the influenza and the first of last week all were brought to the hospital. The two children died shortly after arriving here. The mother is still ill with the disease. Friday 6 Dec 1918

Albert A. Dunn - There has been no severer shock come to the people of Imperial than came to us last Wednesday evening when the sad news was spread around that A.A. Dunn, one of Imperial's most prominent citizens had died. He was sick only five days. Influenza got in its work quickly. Mr. Dunn since coming to Imperial, has built up a business that does credit to the town as well as himself. Albert Alphonso Dunn was born in Campaign, Illinois, December 22, 1881. He was united in marriage with Miss Elsie Kivett March 25, 1903 and for the past five years he has made his home at Imperial. He leaves to mourn his early passing, his wife, his daughter Marie. Funeral services were conducted at the grave in Benkelman cemetery Sunday afternoon, December 1. Imperial Republican Friday 13 Dec 1918

Will Fane Dies - Word was received Monday from Mrs. C.M. Bailey that her brother William Fane, had died at Greybull Wyoming, that his body would be brought to McCook Wednesday for burial. Will Fane lived in this city for a number of years, going from here to Sheridan. He has been in the employ of the Burlington. Friday 13 Dec 1918

Mrs. Isaac Premer Dies - Mrs. Isaac Premer, formerly Miss Grace Hollingworth, died at her home in Palisade, Tuesday, December 10, 1918 of influenza and her husband, who is the Burlington agent at that station is also very ill with the same disease. The deceased was well and favorably known in McCook, where she formerly lived. She was an excellent young woman and at one time was employ in The Republican office. Her many good qualities made her numerous friends who will sincerely regret her death. Friday 13 Dec 1918

Orin Rhoad Dies - Monday morning, December 9, 1918, Orin Rhoad, who has been in the Red Cross Emergency Hospital, in the basement of the Methodist church suffering from influenza, died. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. David Rhoads and was 17 years of age. Other members of the family had been sick with the diseases, and the mother is still confined to the home with it. The family have the sympathy of the community in their sorrow and affliction. Friday 13 Dec 1918

Obituary - On April 27, 1883, at Gibbon, Nebraska, Isah H. Tabott was born. She came to McCook in 1907 and made her home here since. On October 212, 1907 she was married to Artie Walters and to their union 3 children were born, one of whom died in the spring of 1918. Mrs. Walters was a member of the United Evangelical Church for a number of years past and never left that communion. She was taken ill some time ago and was apparently recovered but a relapse occurred and her illness terminated in her decease on Monday December 9, 1918. She leaves her husband, one son, one daughter, her father and mother, two brothers and one sister. Funeral services conducted by Rev. H.C. Seidel were held on Wednesday afternoon, December 11, at Longview cemetery where interment was made. Friday 13 Dec 1918

Died of Wounds - E.E. Young, of this city, superintendent of the McCook division, received word this week that his son Francis, had died, October 14, in France, from wounds he had received in service. The sympathy of the community is extended in the sorrow stricken family. Friday 13 Dec 1918

Mrs. Jacob Eckhart Dies - Sunday morning Mrs. Jacob Eckhart died at her home in South McCook. She had been ill for some time with tuberculosis. Deceased was born August 30, 1888 in Russia. She was married December 25, 1908 to Jacob Eckhart, who with three children survive her. Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon and her body interred in Riverview cemetery, Rev. F. Sattler officiating at the services. The sympathy of the community is extended to the bereaved husband and children. Friday 20 Dec 1918

Death claimed Miss Norma Ruby Friday morning after a two weeks illness of influenza terminating in pneumonia. Her parents Mr. and Mrs. H.L. Ruby, two sisters, Mrs. Belle Gregory and Miss Jewel, two brothers, Fauntleroy and Carlton and a large circle of relatives and friends mourn her untimely death. Miss Norma was an exemplary and highly esteemed young lady a faithful member and enthusiastic worker in the Methodist church, Sunday school and league. At the time of her demise she was employed at the Bastian store, where she has been clerking for the past few years. Brief services were held by Rev. H.M. Woolman Saturday morning at the Danbury cemetery where interment was made. The body was laid beside her brother who proceeded her in death in infancy and sister, Miss Audrey, less than two weeks since of the same fatal disease. Friday 20 Dec 1918

Mrs. Shobe Dies - Mrs. Pearl Shobe, of West McCook who had been suffering with influenza, died at her home Wednesday afternoon, and her husband is quite ill with the disease. She is survived by her husband and one child, who have the sincere sympathy of all in their sorrow. Funeral services will be held this afternoon and her remains buried in Riverview cemetery. Friday 20 Dec 1918

J.W. Smith Dies Suddenly - All Benkelman and the entire community was indeed shocked last Saturday night when the news of the sudden death of John W. Smith pioneer citizen and business man, went out. For his death was sudden indeed. Mr. Smith had gone home from the store near ten o'clock and after visiting with Mrs. Smith and Jessie, both of whom were afflicted with the influenza he started to his bed room to retire. He had scarcely passed within the door when he collapsed, falling backwards. Medical assistance was called but the life had gone out instantly, acute heart failure being the cause. There were few better known men in Dundy county that was John W. Smith. Coming here when only a youth, he remained almost constantly until the day of his death. John William Smith was born on the Atlantic ocean October 25, 1860 and died in Benkelman, Nebraska, December 7, 1918. When nineteen years of age he came to Indianola, Nebraska, at which place he spent one winter after which he came to Benkelman, where he was associated with the Northwestern Cattle company for a number of years. Later he entered the mercantile business and was engaged in the same until the time of his death. He was married to Harriet A. McMurry December 25th, 1888. To this union two children were born, one a son who died in infancy and Jessie B. Smith, a daughter, who together with his wife and only brother of Carlysle, Illinois, survive him. Benkelman Post - Friday 20 Dec 1918

Engineer Sanburn Killed - Crushed Between Engine and Tank in a Collision at Norcatur - The sad news that Engineer J.E. Sanborn had been killed at Norcatur, Kansas, cast a gloom over every one in this city where he was so well known and liked. The accident occurred during a snow storm, Engineer Sanborn was on the east bound train, and was standing on the main line near the water tank at Norcatur. An extra in charge of conductor Childers with M. Pettis as engineer had the snow plow cleared the track and was west bound. They were to meet at Norcatur but on account of the storm the engineer on the snow plow run by the station before he realized just where he was, and struck the passenger Engineer Sanborn was standing in the gangway and when his engine was struck was crushed between the boiler head and tank, killing him instantly. His body was sent here Tuesday night and the funeral services will be held in the Methodist church under the auspices of the I.O.O.F. lodge of which he has been a member many years. John Edwin Sanborn was born at Laconia, New Hampshire, October 12, 1851. He was married to Miss Ellen Frances Gerald on December 24, 1875, at Lake Village, New Hampshire. He began work on the Boston, Concord and Montreal R.R. now the Boston and Maine when he was 20 years of age and has been in that work continuously ever since. He came to Lincoln, Nebraska, September 19, 1883 and entered the employ of the Burlington coming to McCook the next year. He was a conductor on this division until 1888, when he was transferred in the engine service and has been running an engine since that time, on this McCook division. J.E. Sanborn was one of the oldest engineers on this division and one of the most popular. We do not remember of his ever being in a wreck and was always genial. He had acquainted considerable of this world's goods and his hobby of late years was his ranch at Sanborn, the last station in Nebraska on the main line of the Burlington which was named in his honor. He leaves to mourn his death his wife, daughter, Mrs. L.S. Watson of Sanborn and two grandchildren, beside a host of friends. The family have the sincere sympathy of everyone in their sorrow and affliction. Friday 27 Dec 1918